Is It “Have” Or “Has?” (Examples & Quiz)

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What’s the difference: is it “have” or “has?”

“Have” and “has” live a double life.

“Have” can be used in many ways. It can be the main verb, an auxiliary verb or even a gerund. “Has,” on the other hand, is only ever used as a third-person singular present tense form of “have.”

When to Use Has

What does “has” mean? “Has” is the third-person singular present tense form of “have.” It is used to describe the actions of one person, thing, or group of things.

Have Vs Has Example Sentences

Have vs. Has

When we are talking about the possessive:

I, you, we, they use “have” (American and British English) or “have got” (informal British English).

He, she, it use “has” (American and British English) or “has got” (informal British English).

Sentence Examples:

  • I have two cats.
  • You have a lot of energy.
  • We have a meeting at 3 p.m.
  • They have green eyes.
  • He has a cold.
  • She has brown hair.
  • It has four legs.

When we are asking questions and negative sentences (possessive):

Questions

I, you, we, they use “have.”

For example, “have ____(I/you/we/they) got…?” (informal British English)

or “do ____ have…?” (American and British English).

He, she, it use “has.”

For example, “Has _______ (he/she/it) got…?” (informal British English)

or “Does he/she/it have…?” (American and British English)

Sentence Examples:

  • Do you have a pen I can borrow?
  • Have you got a pen I can borrow?
  • Does she have green eyes?
  • Have we won the race?
  • Does he have brown hair?
  • Do they have a place to stay?

Negatives

I, you, we, they use “don’t have” or “haven’t got.”

For example, “_______(I/you/we/they) _______(don’t have/haven’t got)…”

He, she, it use “doesn’t have” or ” hasn’t got.”

For example, “_______(he/she/it) _______(doesn’t have/hasn’t got)…”

Sentence Examples:

  • I don’t have any siblings.
  • You haven’t got any siblings.
  • She doesn’t have a car.
  • He hasn’t got a car.
  • They haven’t got the latest iPhone.
  • We haven’t got a garden.
  • You don’t have any milk in the fridge.

When we are using the present perfect:

I, you, we, they use “have” + present participle.

He, she, it use “has” + present participle.

Sentence Examples:

  • I have finished my homework.
  • You have been to France before.
  • We have seen that movie three times.
  • They have not arrived yet.
  • She has been working on that project for two hours.
  • He has washed the dishes.
  • It has snowed a lot this winter.

When we are asking questions and negative sentences (“have” as an auxiliary verb)

I, you, we, they use “have.”

For example, “have ____(I/you/we/they) +present participle…?”

He, she, it use “has.”

For example, “Has _______(he/she/it) +present participle…?”

Sentence Examples:

  • Have you finished your homework?
  • Has she eaten lunch yet?
  • Have they learned their lesson?
  • Has he been to France before?
  • Have you ever gone skiing?
  • Have we won the race?
  • Has it stopped working?
  • Have they eaten the dessert yet?

Negatives

I, you, we, they use “haven’t.”

For example, “_______(I/you/we/they) haven’t+past participle…”

He, she, it use “hasn’t.”

For example, “_______(he/she/it) hasn’t+past participle…”

Sentence Examples:

  • She hasn’t eaten her lunch.
  • I haven’t brushed my teeth.
  • You haven’t seen the movie yet, have you?
  • They haven’t learned their lesson.
  • Have you finished your homework yet?
  • We haven’t won the prize.
  • It hasn’t rained yet.

Still unsure? Grammarly can correct all your mistakes:

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The Different Ways We Use “Have” and “Has”

Here are the different uses of “have:”

  1. “Have” as an Auxiliary Verb
  2. “Have” For Actions and Experiences
  3. “Have” For Relationships and Possession
  4. “Have” For Obligation (Similar to “Must”)
  5. “Have” For Causing or Experiencing Actions

“Have” as an Auxiliary Verb

“Have” is the verb used to make the present perfect and past perfect forms of verbs.

“Have,” like other auxiliary verbs, can make questions and negatives without “do.”

We can make the perfect verb forms with “have.”

We use “has” and “hasn’t” when talking about he, she and it.

For example:

  • Have you finished your homework yet?
  • Mother had gone to sleep by the time I visited her.
  • They have eaten all the cookies.
  • I haven’t had the best experience at that hotel.
  • You haven’t tried tacos.
  • Have you heard the news?
  • She has written two novels.
  • He has broken his leg.
  • She hasn’t traveled abroad.
  • It has rained for three days straight.
  • Has she drunk the beer yet?
  • The boss has forgotten his keys.

“Have” For Actions and Experiences

“Have” is used to describe actions and experiences.

We need to change the verb to “has” and “doesn’t have” (present tense) when talking about he, she and it.

In this case, questions and negatives are formed with “do.”

For example:

  • I’ll have to think about it.
  • Let’s have a drink after work.
  • I have lunch at 1 p.m. every day.
  • I have a shower every morning before work.
  • Did you have dinner?
  • She has a good time everywhere she goes.
  • She had a fast flight and arrived extra early at her destination.
  • Sometimes I have bad days.
  • Did she have a good day?
  • He has trouble waking up in the morning.
  • The company has a coffee break at 11 a.m.
  • We had a good chat yesterday in the cafe.
  • She doesn’t have lunch at 1 p.m.
  • I told her to have a nice evening.

“Have” For Relationships and Possession

We can use “have” to talk about relationships, possessions, characteristics, illnesses and other states.

We need to change the verb to “has” when talking about he, she and it. We can also say “has got.” This is a more informal way of saying the sentence in British English.

For example:

  • We have (got) five aunts.
  • They have a small car.
  • Do you have a spare pen?
  • I have a stomach-ache.
  • She has more than enough money.
  • Tom doesn’t have a nice personality.
  • He has a bad cough.
  • Does he have a cat?
  • Has he got a cat?
  • The childminder has many kids to take care of.
  • Does the apartment have a balcony?
  • I have a girlfriend.
  • Do you have a bike?
  • Have you got a bike?
  • I haven’t got a bike.
  • She has a scooter.
  • The apartment hasn’t got a desk.

“Have” to Talk About Obligation (Similar to “Must”)

We use “have to” to talk about things we must do.

We need to change the verb to “has to” when talking about he, she and it.

Example sentences:

  • I have to do the housework.
  • You have to take the children to school.
  • I don’t have to take the children to school.
  • Does he have to do his chores?
  • She has to hang up the clothes.
  • He has to wash the dishes.
  • He doesn’t have to wash the dishes.
  • Do I have to go to school?
  • Marta has to tidy her room.
  • Marta doesn’t have to tidy her room.
  • They have to do their homework.
  • We have to make our beds.

“Have” For Causing or Experiencing Actions (with Object and Verb Form)

Other instances for using “have:”

  • I must have my car fixed.
  • I had my phone stolen last week.
  • We soon had everyone enjoying the party.

Contractions of “Has” and “Have”

The contracted forms of “has” and “have” are as follows:

has = ‘s

have = ‘ve

“Have” Sentence Examples

  • I’ve (I have) been to London three times.
  • They haven’t (They have not) finished yet.
  • We haven’t got any apples.
  • I should’ve (I should have) gone to the bank yesterday.
  • You’ve (you have) got blue eyes.
  • We’ve (we have) only got two chairs.
  • You would’ve (You would have) liked her if you had met her.
  • I’ve (I have) been waiting for an hour.
  • They might’ve (They might have) left already.

“Has” Sentence Examples

  • He’s (He has) left his phone at home again.
  • She’s (She has) got a new job.
  • She’s (She has) been working hard all day.
  • The meeting hasn’t (has not) started yet.
  • My mum’s (my mother has) just made some cookies.
  • The cat’s (the cat has) eaten all the food.
  • His car’s (his car has) broken down.
  • He’s (He has) got a cold.
  • It’s (It has) been raining all day.

Quiz Time!

Write “has,” “have,” “haven’t,” or “hasn’t” in each sentence.

1. I _______ a new car.

2. They _______ two dogs.

3. We _______ a lot of fun at the park.

4. You _______ to turn off your phone in the theater.

5. She _______ very long hair.

6. He _______ a big nose.

7. It _______ been snowing all day.

8. The baby _______ a lot of energy.

9. My parents _______ anniversary is next week.

10. Your friends _______ arrived yet.

11. Our team _______ won the game.

12. His new novel _______ just been published.

13. He _______ been to America.

14. _______ you seen the new movie?

15. Does she _______ any money?

16. She _______ got a cat.

17. _______ he gone to the supermarket yet?

18. Does it _______ a washing machine?

Answers:

1. I have a new car.

2. They have two dogs.

3. We had a lot of fun at the park.

4. You have to turn off your phone in the theater.

5. She has very long hair.

6. He has a big nose.

7. It has been snowing all day.

8. The baby has a lot of energy.

9. My parents’ anniversary is next week.

10. Your friends haven’t arrived yet.

11. Our team has finished the game.

12. His new novel has just been published.

13. He has been to America.

14. Have you seen the new movie?

15. Does she have any money?

16. She has got a cat.

17. Has he gone to the supermarket yet?

18. Does it have a washing machine?

In Conclusion

Remembering when to use “has” and when to use “have” can be difficult for English learners. A good rule of thumb is to use “has” with he, she and it and to use “have” with all other pronouns.

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