Is “Messege” Correct? Message, Mesage, Massage

Are you one of those people who gets tripped up by the different spellings of “message”? Or maybe you’re not sure which spelling is correct in which context?

The three different spellings – “messege,” “message,” and “massage” – can be confusing, even for native English speakers.

But don’t worry, we’re here to help. This article will explain the difference between these three words and give you some tips on when to use each one.

In short:

Messege– not a word

Mesage– not a word

Message– a form of communication

Massage– a muscle rub!

Messege

Let’s start off by stating that messege is NOT a word. It is simply a misspelling of the word “message” or “massage.”

You may also be confusing the word with “messenger.” This means someone who carries a message or (a more modern-day meaning) the messenger app by Meta!

Mesage

Mesage is also not a word. It is a typo. Please do not use it!

Message

Now that we’ve got that out of the way let’s move on to discussing the word “message.”

The word “message” can be used as a noun or a verb.

As a noun, it refers to a piece of information that is conveyed from one person to another. For example, you might say, “I left a message for John on his voicemail.”

As a verb, “message” means to send a message or communicate with someone. For example, you might say, “Can you message me the details of the meeting?”

Examples of Sentences with “Message”

Other examples of sentences with the word “message” include:

  • I’m sorry, I didn’t get your message.
  • Could you please message me the requirements?
  • I left a message for John on his voicemail.
  • What’s the main message of the book?
  • Please be respectful and do not spam the chatroom with messages.
  • Send me a message when you’re ready to talk.

Message Synonyms

  • News
  • Word
  • Communication
  • Note
  • Notice
  • Letter
  • Memo

Massage

The word “massage” means to rub and press someone’s muscles in order to relax them. It can act as a noun; for example, you might say, “I’m going to go get a massage.”

Massage as a verb means the act of massaging someone. You can receive a massage from a professionally trained massage therapist.

You may also be interested in: 15 Best Online English Courses Free & Paid (2022)

In Conclusion

So there you have it – the difference between “message,” “message,” “mesage” and “massage.”

Just remember that “messege” and “mesage” are not words, and you’ll be good to go!

We hope this article helped clear things up for you. If you still have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

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I'm an Irish tutor and founder of TPR Teaching. I started teaching in 2016 and have since taught in the UK, Spain, and online.

I love learning new things about the English language and how to teach it better. I'm always trying to improve my knowledge, so I can better meet the needs of others!

I enjoy traveling, nature walks, and soaking up a new culture. Please share the posts if you find them helpful!

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